•  Social Studies

    Unit 1 -Introduction To Geography
    Unit 2 -The East Region
    Unit 3 -The South Region
    Unit 4 -The Midwest Region
    Unit 5 -The West Region

  • GRADE 4 SOCIAL STUDIES

    What children will study this year:Students with map
    The fourth grade social studies program is hands-on and content-rich. During the school year, children in fourth grade learn about the major regions of the United States.

    What makes each region unique?
    • Climate
    • Geography: location, landforms, etc
    • Culture
    • Economy
    • People, events and ideas
    • Change in regions: how and why regions change (e.g., population centers and settlement, patterns, business and industry, use of resources, transportation, economies, major historical events, culture)
    • Similarities and differences between U.S. regions
    • Minnesota geography
    Children also learn and apply basic social studies skills, including:
    • Applying the five themes of geography (i.e. location, place, human-environment interaction, movement, and region)
    • Analyzing how climate and geography affects regions
    • Reading and using a variety of maps
    • Reading and making maps, graphs, diagram and charts.
    • Applying basic citizenship skills (e.g., working together in groups to solve problems, rights and responsibilities of citizens, forms of government, national symbols)
    • Identifying cause and effect, identifying point of view, making generalizations and forming conclusions and predicting outcomes.
    Anoka-Hennepin Program Understandings articulate what students should understand and be able to do when they       leave the K-12 program in Anoka-Hennepin. The grade level understandings demonstrate what students should understand and be able to do when they leave each grade level. The grade level understandings increase in complexity as students progress through the K-12 program.
    GRADE 4 SOCIAL STUDIES UNITS:
     
    Unit: Five Themes of Geography: This unit focuses on map skills and the Five Themes of Geography. This provides students with background information needed for studying the regions of the United States.
    What families can do at home to help:
    • Study maps of the United States to develop an understanding of states, capitals, and major landforms.
    • Practice the absolute location of your home (your address).
    • Discuss characteristics of your home and neighborhood.
    Unit Information for FamiliesAcademic Standards, what students should know and be able to do, and vocabulary.


    Unit: The East: Through studying the East, teachers will be setting up ongoing routines that will support your study of the other regions. The first 9 lessons build a foundation for understanding the East through the lens of the Five Themes of Geography. Students will learn about the landforms, economy, important people and events, and climate of this region. Lessons 10-14 focus on immigration.
    What families can do at home to help:
    • Talk about where your family’s ancestors are from.
    • Discuss natural resources that are important where you live and how they help the people of your region. Discuss our local and national governments and how representatives are elected.
    Unit Information for FamiliesAcademic Standards, what students should know and be able to do, and vocabulary.


    Unit: The South: This unit examines the landforms, economy, culture, and climate of the South. Through other lessons, students will learn about people and events that helped shape the culture of the South as we know it today.
    What families can do at home to help:
    • Make travel plans, real or pretend, for a tour of the South.
    • Discuss how the climate and agriculture in the South differ from where you live.
    • Discuss the cultural features (ethnic celebrations, places of interest to visit, ethnic groups, languages spoken, etc.) of your city and other major U.S. cities.
    Unit Information for FamiliesAcademic Standards, what students should know and be able to do, and vocabulary.


    Unit: The Midwest: This is a unit that examines the Midwest region’s land, climate, economy, resources, and people. Students will learn about the geography, climate, resources, and major industries of the Midwest. Students will also focus on key events that helped shape the culture of the Midwest as we know it today.
    What families can do at home to help:
    • Visit a local museum to explore the people, culture and history of the Midwest (Anoka Country Historical Society, Minnesota History Center, MN African American Museum and Cultural Center, Russian Museum of Art, Hmong Cultural Center, Mill City Museum, Mille Lacs Indian Museum, etc.). Note: Your county library has information on free passes available for various museum locations around the metro area. For more information on the Museum Adventure Pass visit a county library branch near you or visit http://www.melsa.org/MuseumAdventurePass.
    • Talk about how the land and weather affect the way your family lives.
    • Visit the state capitol building.
    Unit Information for FamiliesAcademic Standards, what students should know and be able to do, and vocabulary.

     
    Unit: The West: This is a unit that examines the West region’s land, climate, economy, resources, and people. Students will learn about the geography,
    climate, resources, and major industries of the West. Students will also focus on key events that helped shape the culture of the West as we know it today.
    What families can do at home to help:
    • Visit your local library and check out books about one of the many national parks in the West.
    • Make a weather chart and compare and contrast the weather in cities in the West with where you live. How does the weather affect how people live and work?
    • Discuss plants and animals that live in your region. What are the plants and animals of the West?

    Unit Information for Families - Academic Standards, what students should know and be able to do, and vocabulary.