• English Language Arts- Kindergarten 

     
    Curriculinks- Online activities

    READING
    What children will learn this year:
    The kindergarten English language arts program is designed to build on the language that children bring to school and to promote interest in books and learning to read. They participate in whole-class, small group and independent reading activities.
    Foundational:

    • Demonstrates understanding of print features - Students demonstrate understanding of basic print features by tracking print from left to right, recognizing words are written by specific sequences of letters and by naming 50-52 alphabet letters fluently.
    • Demonstrates understanding of spoken words and sounds - Students demonstrate understanding by producing rhyming words, blending and segmenting syllables, hearing beginning, middle, ending sounds in words, and making new words.
    • Applies phonics and word reading skills - Students demonstrate one-to-one letter sound correspondence of consonants and long & short vowel sounds, read and write common sight words.
    • Reads grade level text 

    Literature:

    • Asks and answers questions about the text - Students demonstrate reading comprehension strategies by asking and answering questions, and making connections between pictures and words during whole group, small group, and independent reading.Retells story including character, setting and events
    • Students demonstrate reading comprehension strategies by retelling a story in sequence naming character, setting, major events, and key details during whole group, small group, and independent reading. 

    Informational:

    • Asks and answers questions about key details in a text - Students demonstrate reading comprehension by asking and answering questions about key details in a text during whole group, small group, and independent reading.
    • Identifies main topic and retells key details in a text - Students demonstrate reading comprehension by identifying the main topic, retelling key details, and describing connections between ideas, events, people or pictures within the text during whole group, small group, and independent reading. 

    What families can do at home to help:

    • Talk with your child. Talking is one of the most important things you can do with your child. It helps your child connect the spoken with the written word.
    • Point out the print around your child every day, i.e., street signs and signs advertising stores and products.
    • Read to your child. Talk about what you are reading. Discuss the story, have your child predict what will happen next or how they think the story will end, and let your child tell you the story after reading it. Re-read stories.
    • Read nursery rhymes (over and over and over), read poetry, and sing songs.
    • Let your child see you and family or friends reading. Try to have both women and men model reading
    • Encourage creativity in dramatic play
    • Encourage your child to ask questions
    • Read with your child everyday
    • Stop what you are doing and look at the person who is speaking
    • Don't talk or move when a person is speaking
    • Think about what the person is saying 

    SPEAKING, LISTENING, VIEWING
    What children will learn this year:

    The kindergarten English language arts program is designed to build on the language that children bring to school and to promote interest in books and learning to read. They participate in whole-class, small group and independent reading activities.

    • Effectively participates in discussions within a group - Students demonstrate understanding when they can follow rules for discussion, listen to others, follow basic directions and ask questions to confirm understanding.
    • Presents information and ideas effectively - Students demonstrate effective skills for communication. 

    What families can do at home to help:

    • Talk with your child. Talking is one of the most important things you can do with your child. It helps your child connect the spoken with the written word.
    • Encourage creativity in dramatic play
    • Encourage your child to ask questions
    • Stop what you are doing and look at the person who is speaking
    • Don't talk or move when a person is speaking
    • Think about what the person is saying 

    WRITING
    What children will study this year:
    Kindergartners regularly engage in a mini-lesson (with explicit instruction focused on writing skills and strategies), write, confer with a teacher about their writing, and share their writing with others including peers, parents and teachers.
    Writing:

    • Communicates ideas through pictures and words:
    • Communicates ideas to the reader. Ideas are organized and word choice is effective. Simple stories are written using simple sentences.
    • Responds to questions and suggestions to strengthen writing:
    • Completes writing, staying on one topic. Adds important details to help reader understand. 

    What families can do at home to help:

    • Have your child draw pictures about experiences they have at home.
    • Assist your child in labeling their pictures using inventive spelling (write the sounds they hear).
    • Have your child tell or share their writing with you and others.
    • Read cookbooks and how-to directions with your child.
    • Read texts about topics your child is interested in learning more about.
    • Have your child begin to write sentences to match their pictures. Words do not need to be spelled correctly.
    • Encourage your child to add detail in their writing to make it interesting to the reader.
    • Display your child’s writing and praise their efforts to help build self-confidence 

    Language:

    • Uses language conventions when writing and/or speaking:
    • The student demonstrates the ability to use words purposefully when writing or speaking.
    • Acquires and uses appropriate vocabulary:
    • The student demonstrates understanding when they use language acquired from books and classroom experiences.
    • Learns handwriting skills: 

    What families can do at home to help:

    • Scribbling is your child's experimentation with writing. It is important to encourage the scribbling and to give a lot of adult praise for the attempts at writing.
    • Allow your child to "write" stories and read them back to you.
    • Provide materials such as large crayons, chalk, markers, pencils, paints, and wide-lined paper.
    • Provide a comfortable place for children to sit and write. Let the child determine how far to be from the paper.
    • Let your child see you write. Explain to your child what your writing says and why you are writing. When you make shopping lists, leave phone messages, or write notes, provide paper and pencil for your child to write, too.
    • Write messages. Help your child write reminders and calendar entries, such as "Library Day is Friday" or "Tomorrow we go to the dentist."
    • Keep a home calendar. Record and anticipate important events with your child. A picture or sticker on a calendar can also be a form of writing your child could add to make a message, such as a drawing of a tooth for a reminder of a dental check-up.
    • Narrate family happenings. Help your child write stories to go with drawings or photos of family events. Relatives might enjoy reading these!
    • Display your child's drawings and writing where they can be seen