• ART GRADE 2
    What children will study this year:
    Students drawing This course is taught by an Art Specialist. It is the goal of the elementary art program to develop an understanding of art that will lead to a lifetime of art appreciation. Students will continue to learn about and create visual artworks by:

    • Exploring the elements of art: line, shape, color, texture, value, space and form. They will specifically learn more deeply about color, value, space and texture in second grade.
    • Making different types of artwork.
    • Using a variety of art materials and tools.
    • Learning about artists and how they create art.
    • Looking at a variety of artwork.
    • Exploring how to create tints and shades.
    • Discovering how artists create a feeling of depth in their artworks.
    • Exploring how to use different materials to create visual and physical textures.


    What you can do at home to help:

    • Work with your child to create artwork about family, friends or your neighborhood.
    • Play an observation game. Look through a paper towel or toilet paper cardboard tube to identify details of an object. Describe the details using the elements of art: line, shape, color, texture, value, space and form.
    • Together with your child, create a color scrapbook. Find colors in magazines and cut out pictures of things that are the same color. Or, take pictures of your own to use.
    • Together, read picture books about different artists and art.
    • Collect objects in nature, such as: pine cones, seeds from trees, leaves, twigs, and small rocks. Ask your child to describe how each object feels. What words describe the texture? (smooth, bumpy, pointy, rough).
    • Take your child to a local art museum. The Twin Cities and surrounding area has a wide variety of art to view in person. Visit the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum, Minnesota Museum of American Art, Museum of Russian Art
    • Attend special art events at the Banfille Locke Center for the Arts, Minnesota Center for Book Arts, Caponi Art Park, Franconia Sculpture Park, Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Silverwood Park.

    Program and Grade Level Understandings

    Anoka-Hennepin Program Understandings articulate what students should understand and be able to do when they leave the K-12 program in Anoka-Hennepin. The grade level understandings demonstrate what students should understand and be able to do when they leave each grade level. The grade level understandings increase in complexity as students progress through the K-12 program.

    Curriculinks- online activities


    Grade 2 Art Units:

    Unit 1 Color and Value
    This unit will be a continuation of what students have learned in 1st grade third trimester, Color. This unit will focus on Color and Value specifically, tints and
    shades. The students will be given a variety of materials and activities to demonstrate their knowledge of the Elements Color and Value. There will be opportunities for guided practice, peer review, critiquing famous artwork and their own artwork.

    What families can do at home to help:
    • Look at a colored object (such as a tennis ball, or toy car) in different kinds of light: sunlight, flash light, spot light, lamp, etc. How does the color look different with different lighting?
    • Gather different shades of paint sample colors from your local hardware store. Choose all of one color, but different degrees of light and dark (tints and shades). Create a game, putting all of the colors in an order, from the lightest to darkest.
    Unit Information for Families- Academic Standards, what students should know and be able to do, and vocabulary.

    Unit 2 Space

    What families can do at home to help:

    • Look at different works of art. Ask your child - what is in the background of the artwork? What is in the middle ground of the artwork? What is in the foreground?
    • Experiment with photography. Take a photo of an object, such as a flower. Then, take two more photos - one very close up and another from far away. What photo is the most interesting? Why?
    • Take your own family or friend photos. First, have everyone stand the same distance away from the camera. Then another, with people at different distances from the camera. Look at the photos and compare: How do the people look different in each photo?

    Unit Information for Families- Academic Standards, what students should know and be able to do, and vocabulary.


    Unit 3 Texture
    What families can do at home to help:

    • Put different textured objects in brown paper bags. Without looking, guess what each object is.
    • Go for a walk outside. Collect different textured objects. Do texture rubbings with them, place a paper over the object, and rubbing a crayon sideways over the paper.
    • Create a collage using different textures fabrics, cardboard paper, and other materials.

    Unit Information for Families- Academic Standards, what students should know and be able to do, and vocabulary.