• SOCIAL STUDIES GRADE 2
    What children will study this yearstudents with coordinate grid

    The second grade social studies program is hands-on and content- rich. During the school year, children learn how people live together in communities. Topics include:

    • Citizenship: Rules, rights and responsibilities in our community. Economics: Thoughtful decision-makers.
    • History: Dakota and Anishinaabe people.
    • Geography: Human interaction with the environment.
    • Geography skills: Read and create maps, use globes and locate physical features.
    Program and Grade Level Understandings
    Anoka-Hennepin Program Understandings articulate what students should understand and be able to do when they leave the K-12 program in Anoka-Hennepin. The grade level understandings demonstrate what students should understand and be able to do when they leave each grade level. The grade level understandings increase in complexity as students progress through the K-12 program.

    Curriculinks- online activities


    Grade 2 Social Studies Units:
    Unit: Citizenship Rules, Rights, and Responsibilities: This unit examines how rules, rights and responsibilities support communities. Students will learn that different communities create different sets of rules depending on their needs. Students will explain the importance of constitutions. Students will demonstrate voting skills, identify rules that keep a voting process fair, and explain why voting is important.  Students will also learn about Citizenship/Constitution Day.

    What families can do at home to help:

    • Discuss the roles of each family member. Discuss the roles of school staff. How are they the same? How are they different?
    • Discuss rules at home and rules at school. How are they different? How are they the same?
    • Discuss what your family could do to make your home or community a better place to live.

    Curriculum Information for Families- Academic Standards, what students should know and be able to do, and vocabulary.


    Unit: History: Dakota and Anishinaabe:This unit examines history“ through the lenses of the Dakota and Anishinaabe peoples. Students will learn about daily life for Minnesota Dakota and Anishinaabe peoples in different times, including before European contact and today. Students will learn how the culture of a community reflects the history, daily life or beliefs of its people. Students will use historical records and artifacts to describe how people’s lives have changed over time. Students will use the seasons to measure the passing of time and discover how each season influences the interactions of Anishinaabe community

    What families can do at home to help:
    • Visit the library to learn more about the Dakota and Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) People.
    • Help children explore (make and eat) some of the foods that are important to the native people of Minnesota. Research recipes that use wild rice, corn, or real maple syrup.
    • Conduct online research to find activities sponsored by tribal groups that are native to Minnesota. Example: The Mille Lacs Indian Museum is a museum dedicated to the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe's history, culture, and contemporary life.

    Curriculum Information for Families- Academic Standards, what students should know and be able to do, and vocabulary.


    Unit: Economics Decision Making : This unit examines the study of economics. It includes understanding types of resources, recognizing money as an item of exchange, and making choices by examining trade-offs and opportunity costs.
    What families can do at home to help:

    Curriculum Information for FamiliesAcademic Standards, what students should know and be able to do, and vocabulary.


    Unit: Geography Understanding Maps and the Environment: In this unit, students will learn and understand why the world around them is important in their lives. Through experiences with maps and globes, students will identify and locate landforms and landmarks, answer questions about places, and think about the interactions between humans and the environment.
    What families can do at home to help:

    • Teach your child the home address.
    • Use a map (city map or draw your own) to locate home, school, place of worship, grocery store, etc.
    • Examine a Minnesota or USA map. Locate places your family has visited or would like to visit in the future.

    Curriculum Information for Families- Academic Standards, what students should know and be able to do, and vocabulary.